K series engine

300HP FULLY BUILT K24 ENGINE ASSEMBLY! EP 2 - Building A 300HP All Motor Honda/Acura

It's been more than a decade since Honda introduced its K-series engine family and a lot's changed since then. What was first met with resentment from Honda fans all-too complacent with B18Cs and LS-VTECs has developed into it becoming the engine of choice, especially for naturally aspirated hard-liners who pine for cubic inches and a modernized valvetrain. Thirteen years later, though, and there's a whole lot of K-series engines to sort through, which can make choosing the right one downright baffling.

You don't need to be told that not all K-series engines are the same. Pick the wrong one and you might have been better off putting up with whatever B-series you've shunned as its predecessor. And none of this has ever been more true than now, especially when considering Honda's new fleet of K-series engines that care more about reduced emissions and fuel consumption than they do horsepower and upgradability.

Follow along as we break down Honda's most popular K-series powerplants, from past to present. But first, a little history.

Following a year reign, the B-series was finally nixed and, in late, replaced with the then-unfamiliar K20A2, K20A3, and K24A1.

The new platform's most notable differences when compared to previous four-cylinder Honda mills is its direct-fire ignition system, reverse layout, and clockwise rotation. To improve catalytic converter light-off by positioning the engine's exhaust side toward the rear of the vehicle, Honda developed a clockwise-rotating architecture, which is a whole lot different than the decades worth of counter-clockwise-rotating engines the company's become famous for.

The number of K-series engine designations aren't few, but fortunately almost all of them can be traced back to Honda's initial K20A2 and K20A3.

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Unofficially known as performance i-VTEC, such engines feature Honda's most impressive valvetrain to date. At the heart is something you've heard of: VTEC.

Like its predecessors, inside the cylinder head lies Honda's hydraulically operated variable valve timing system. Simple and elegant, VTEC allows the engine to alternate between two different camshaft profiles depending on various conditions. Here, a specialized camshaft gear allows for continuously variable intake camshaft phasing throughout the RPM range.

Based upon all sorts of things that the driver needn't worry about, like camshaft position, ignition timing, exhaust oxygen content, and throttle position, a degree range of camshaft phasing can occur degree range on K24A2. Much like VTEC, the camshaft gear is electronically controlled and hydraulically driven, resulting in reduced timing at idle and advanced timing at higher engine speeds, which increases valve overlap and power.

The advantages up top span beyond the valvetrain. Performance i-VTEC engines also feature more optimally shaped intake and exhaust ports when compared to the B-series and larger ports when compared to other K-series engines. On the intake side, they form a nearly straight path. On the exhaust side, they're free of the humps typically found within B-series ports.

K-series engines also benefit from sophisticated roller rocker arms, which reduce valvetrain friction and allow for all manner of billet camshafts. This is in stark contrast to older Honda engines that feature standard, pad-style rocker arms. Down below, every 2. Also known as a square design, such engine architectures are a good compromise between decent low-end torque and adequate top end power.

The 2. In terms of crankshafts, each is forged from high-quality steel, but only performance i-VTEC versions feature a fully counter-weighted design.Judging from internet forum wars, riddled with fiery posts and personal attacks, the choice between a Honda B or K series engine is more a religious decision than one based on fact or mechanical superiority. Even within the brand, engine loyalties abound. However, when the smoke from the forum flames clears, each one of these capable engines has a unique set of pros and cons to weigh.

K Series Engines

The first consideration that needs to be made is cash. Few automotive enthusiasts have access to a money tree or the limitless financial resources to throw stacks of cash at a project.

For that reason the B series is a budget friendly choice.

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While the B is no sissy, with racing examples regular eclipsing the 1, horsepower mark and street builds sneaking up on unsuspecting V8s, it is still a baby in the eyes of the aftermarket: their baby.

First introduced to the US inthe B-series has been the go-to platform of Honda tuners for 25 years.

k series engine

In that time, aftermarket companies have been building, testing, and selling parts for the platform in droves; making them plentiful, time-tested and, most importantly, very affordable. If budget is a major concern in a planned build, the B series certainly shines. And, thanks to a year production run, there are plenty of B-series cores ripe for the picking on your Craigslist locality of choice. Most examples — especially the B16s and B18A series — can be picked up for a few hundred bucks, but rarer trims such as the B18Cs and B18C5s still command primo coin.

In a few years, as more and more K-powered vehicles find their way into junkyards across the country, core prices will drop even further making this engine more accessible to tuners.

K-Series Engine Family Breakdown - K-Series Refresher

When pricing out a project, it is important to look at the big picture. This K24 engine features an 87mm bore and 99mm stroke, huge for any Honda platform. The shorter and more recent. Retrofitting a K engine certainly requires much more involvement than using a B series engine, which many older Honda platforms came with from the factory in either USDM or JDM iterations.

Even with aftermarket sleeves, the displacement capacity of the B series is limited by the bore spacing. And, this statement rings especially true in the world of naturally aspirated power. Due to this fact, the K series engines have a solid advantage over the Bs. With a square 86mm x 86mm bore and stroke, as delivered from Honda, the smallest variant of the K20 series still puts a. In the world of Honda four-cylinders, even the smaller K is big; but, they get even bigger.

Displacement, however, is only half the battle. This B-series block is being prepped with cylinder Sleeves from Golden Eagle Manufacturing for big boost and insane horsepower. The cylinder heads on the performance variants of the K-series engines are some of the best the company has ever designed. Laskey's Bad B Series. The engine has been prepped with Benson sleeves, CP pistons and Carrillo rods.However, it went on to earn itself an unenviable reputation for fragility in both four- and six-cylinder forms.

Keith Adams discusses this controversial engine, then Mike Humble blows the myths and explains the fixes, and Simon Erland goes into massive detail into how Lotus learnings can make the K-Series bulletproof….

How to replace the irreplaceable A-Series engine? Build a light, powerful and technically advanced power unit, spend years developing it to perfection; then introduce it in a highly impressive new medium-sized car. You quickly follow this up with a new small car which is a quantum leap ahead of the existing one.

Austin Rover demonstrated that it was able to build a competitive and advanced engine, when it created the M16 out of the rather average O-Series back in That development programme, headed by Roland Bertodo, had been hamstrung by the fact that it used an existing engine as its base: with the K-Series unit, the engine men started from scratch and used the opportunity to really stretch their creative impulses.

It may have seemed like a good idea to the Government, but Ray Horrocks and Harold Musgrove certainly did not agree — both fearing that Austin Rover would have lost a great deal of its independence if it no longer produced its own mid-market engine. Musgrove was especially passionate about this — and barracked the then Trade and Industry Secretary, Norman Tebbitt, into seeing the BL point of view: it worked — Tebbitt was persuaded and the Government capitulated, allowing the continued funding of the K-Series.

The company knew that in order to replace the A-Series engine, the engine would need to be both powerful and compact — and, in order to achieve these goals, it would need to be highly advanced. Another consideration was that the changing tide within European legislation meant that emissions were being pushed further up the agenda and, because of this, the design would need to be such that it would meet and succeed any potential new regulations.

Needless to say, the company was right in this assertion an,d before long, lean-burn engines would be all the rage.

Rover K-series engine

To meet these goals, the engine was constructed of alloy, and ingeniously, to ensure that the pressures within the engine were evenly distributed, a long bolt configuration was adopted. In other words, the engine was basically of a sandwich design and holding it all together were inch long bolts that plunged from the cylinder head to the sump, top to bottom.

Other advances were that the K-Series unit was designed from the outset to be used with a twin-cam, valve cylinder head; a quite exotic configuration back inbut necessary in order to gain enough specific output in order to meet upcoming emissions regulations.

Initially launched in 1.

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This ensured that Rover would not be dependent on Honda for its mid-sized engine range and paved the way for the hot versions of the Rover and MGF. With Honda power, these cars would in most likelihood been just as impressive, but less British.

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The KV6 version of this engine was first used in the Roverbut it should be noted that this was a very different beast to the similarly-named power unit that would find its way into the Rover 75 and MG ZT. An insider described the earlier engine as very much a practice run, produced in an almost hand-built way — unfortunately, that led to fragility in theand many power units expired before they hit the 60, mile mark.

He said that it was on the early ones used in the but that the whole engine had been redesigned for the 75 to make it narrower to fit under the shorter bonnet.

k series engine

The heads are the same, although Rover changed the top covers. The inlet manifold is totally different — it does not have the dual butterfly-type throttle body like the early one.The K series was introduced in by Rover Group as a powerplant for the Rover car.

It was the second volume-production implementation of the low-pressure sand-casting or LPS technique in a new plant sited between East Works and Cofton Hackett. The first volume application of the LPS process had been for the M cylinder head, produced in South Works, adjacent to the former forge. The LPS process pumped liquid aluminium into a chemically-bonded sand mould from below. The process avoided many of the inherent problems of casting aluminium components and consequently permitted lower casting wall thickness and higher strength-to-weight ratios.

However, the process required the use of heat-treated LM25 material which gave the engines a reputation for being fragile. An engine overheat would often result in the material becoming annealed and rendering the components scrap.

The layout of the engine bay on some Rover cars fitted with K-series engines — particularly the MGF with its mid-engined layout — means that a commonly-occurring coolant leak under the inlet manifold can go undetected until severe damage has been done to the head. The aluminium engine blocks were fitted with spun-cast iron cylinder liners that were initially manufactured by GKN 's Sheepbridge Stokes of Chesterfieldbut these were replaced by liners made by Goetze after some seminal research conducted by Charles Bernstein at Longbridge[ citation needed ] which proved influential even to Ducati for their race engines.

The engine was introduced initially in 1. Because Honda stopped providing Rover with engines after the end of their relationship, but well before the BMW takeover, an enlargement of the K Series design to 1.

This was done by using larger diameter cylinder liners and also increasing the stroke. The change required a block redesign with the removal of the cylinder block's top deck and a change from "wet" liners to "damp" liners. They also included aluminium and larger sized bodies.

The four-cylinder engines were held together as a sandwich of components by long through-bolts which held the engine under compression, though this construction is not unknown, and was used in early lightweight fighter engines from the First World War. It had also been used in motorcycle engines and Triumph Car's "Sabrina" race engine.

The two types of head that were bolted to the common four-cylinder block were designated K8 8 valves and K16 16 valves. This allowed more power to be developed without compromising low-speed torque and flexibility.

Following the collapse of MG Rover inthe K Series engine started a new and rather interesting chapter in its history.

Two separate re-developments of the engine were taking place by at the time two rival Chinese car firms. The Chinese automaker Nanjing Automobile NAC purchased the assets of MG Rover and in doing so acquired use of the Longbridge plant and the intellectual property rights and production tooling to many designs, including those of the K series engine. With the help of Lotus Engineering, NAC went on to produce the N Series an improved version of the K Series with redesigned headgasket and oil rail built on the original tooling.

Contrary to popular belief, the N Series was never fitted to the MG 6. Whilst they had the necessary knowhow they didn't have any tooling so had to essentially reverse engineer their version of the engine. The advantage of this was it allowed Ricardothe company tasked by SAIC to carry out development the opportunity to improve the engine in a number of areas.

The main area's of improvement included the head being redesigned to improve the waterways and structural rigidity and the block was also strengthened. All new tooling was used in its production and the quality of materials and that of the aluminium casting process created a much more substantial update than that of the N Series. Early K8 engines used a single SU KIF carburetor with a manual choke and a breaker-less distributor mounted on the end of the camshaft.

K16 models used MEMSwith a 1. With the launch of the Rover 25 and Rover 45 inMEMS 3 was introduced, with twin coils and sequential injection. All engines displace 1. Four variations were created:.They were robust, powerful and reliable. Millions are still in service today and run just like they did when they were made dating back to the 's. Here are 5 reasons from a technical standpoint on why you should rebuild them instead of buying a new engine.

They are heavy. In most applications today their power to weight ratio is not considered impressive. But when they power 4 wheeled machines such as Lawn and Garden Tractors, Skidsteers, and Road Grading Machines, you want that weight to aid in delivering that power to the ground. The crankshaft in a Kohler K Series Engine is supported by open ball bearings. The bearings are large and provide a lot of support for the crankshaft.

This translates into longer life, and more durable performance. The air-cooled design and splash oil system works, and it keeps it simple. Less parts means easier to rebuild and keep running for another 50 years. The Cast Iron Block, combined with a great bearing system, cooling, and lubrication system makes the Kohler K Series Engine a great engine. Kohler graciously offers service manuals for their entire line of K series engines to download for free!

The Kohler K Series service manuals explains everything from beginning to end on how to rebuild their engine. With it's simple design and few parts, anyone with minimal tools can rebuild their own engine. And if you get stuck on something you can always call iSaveTractors to help you! Here are 5 Reasons. Cast Iron Engine Block: They are heavy. The cast iron engine blocks also don't warp during high torque applications.

Simple Flat Head Design The Valves are in the block which simplifies maintenance and minimizes parts. Simple Oil and Cooling System The air-cooled design and splash oil system works, and it keeps it simple. It's Easy Kohler graciously offers service manuals for their entire line of K series engines to download for free!The Honda K-series engine is a line of four-cylinder four-stroke car engine introduced in The engines use a coil-on-plug, distributorless ignition system with a coil for each spark plug.

This system forgoes the use of a conventional distributor-based ignition timing system in favor of a computer-controlled system that allows the ECU to control ignition timings based on various sensor inputs. The cylinders have cast iron sleeves similar to the B- and F-series engines, as opposed to the FRM cylinders found in the H- and newer F-series engines found only in the Honda S Similar to B series, the K-series car engines have two short blocks with the same design; the only difference between them being the deck height.

K20 uses the short block with a deck height of mm where K23 and K24 block has a deck height of The VTEC system on engines like the K20A3 only operate on the intake cam; at low rpm only one intake valve is fully opened, the other opening just slightly to create a swirl effect in the combustion chamber for improved fuel atomization. At high rpm, both intake valves open fully to improve engine breathing.

Similar to K20A3 and K20A1. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the Honda engine. For the Rover engine series of the same name, see Rover K engine. For the Toyota engine series of the same name, see Toyota K engine. Further information: Earth Dreams Technology. JDM Spec Engines. Retrieved 20 May Retrieved 21 April Retrieved 15 October Retrieved Honda Thailand in Thai.Judging from internet forum wars, riddled with fiery posts and personal attacks, the choice between a Honda B or K series engine is more a religious decision than one based on fact or mechanical superiority.

Even within the brand, engine loyalties abound. However, when the smoke from the forum flames clears, each one of these capable engines has a unique set of pros and cons to weigh.

The first consideration that needs to be made is cash. Few automotive enthusiasts have access to a money tree or the limitless financial resources to throw stacks of cash at a project.

For that reason the B series is a budget friendly choice. While the B is no sissy, with racing examples regular eclipsing the 1, horsepower mark and street builds sneaking up on unsuspecting V8s, it is still a baby in the eyes of the aftermarket: their baby. First introduced to the US inthe B-series has been the go-to platform of Honda tuners for 25 years.

In that time, aftermarket companies have been building, testing, and selling parts for the platform in droves; making them plentiful, time-tested and, most importantly, very affordable. If budget is a major concern in a planned build, the B series certainly shines. And, thanks to a year production run, there are plenty of B-series cores ripe for the picking on your Craigslist locality of choice. Most examples — especially the B16s and B18A series — can be picked up for a few hundred bucks, but rarer trims such as the B18Cs and B18C5s still command primo coin.

In a few years, as more and more K-powered vehicles find their way into junkyards across the country, core prices will drop even further making this engine more accessible to tuners. When pricing out a project, it is important to look at the big picture.

k series engine

This K24 engine features an 87mm bore and 99mm stroke, huge for any Honda platform. The shorter and more recent. Retrofitting a K engine certainly requires much more involvement than using a B series engine, which many older Honda platforms came with from the factory in either USDM or JDM iterations.

Even with aftermarket sleeves, the displacement capacity of the B series is limited by the bore spacing. And, this statement rings especially true in the world of naturally aspirated power. Due to this fact, the K series engines have a solid advantage over the Bs. With a square 86mm x 86mm bore and stroke, as delivered from Honda, the smallest variant of the K20 series still puts a. In the world of Honda four-cylinders, even the smaller K is big; but, they get even bigger. Displacement, however, is only half the battle.

This B-series block is being prepped with cylinder Sleeves from Golden Eagle Manufacturing for big boost and insane horsepower.

The cylinder heads on the performance variants of the K-series engines are some of the best the company has ever designed. Laskey's Bad B Series. The engine has been prepped with Benson sleeves, CP pistons and Carrillo rods. Portflow handled the head-porting duties while Supertech valvetrain actuates the valves. While the K-series does pack the previously mentioned, higher-flowing cylinder head and displacement bump, the B easily overcomes those perks with boost.

B and K engines can take quite a bit of abuse before reaching there limits but both will need sleeving, uprated fasteners, pistons and connecting rods when extremely high boost and power numbers are planned. With that being said, there is some dissent among top Honda builders about horsepower limitations of each of these engines in stock form.

Rodcharoen advises that the stock sleeves be replaced when approaching the horsepower level on B series engines.


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